Technical Support FAQ's

Windows® does not recognize my SSD with a drive letter when I connect it, what do I do?

Please make sure to have data and power cables properly connected to your SSD. If this is that case, you will have to initialize your SSD in Windows® in order to use it. Please use the steps below: Please g...

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My Mac supports SATA 3Gbit/s but I only get SATA 1.5Gbit/s speed. Why?

On some older Mac platforms that are designed to deliver SATA 3Gbit/s performance, modern SSDs may receive a SATA 1.5Gbit/s link speed negotiation only. This is usually caused by one of the following reasons:...

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Will disk defragmentation be disabled by default on SSDs using Windows® 7 and later?

Yes. The automatic scheduling of defragmentation will exclude partitions on devices that declare themselves as SSDs. Additionally, if the system disk has random read performance characteristics above the thresh...

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Is NTFS Compression of Files and Directories recommended on SSDs?

Compressing files help save space, but the effort of compressing and decompressing requires extra CPU cycles and therefore power on mobile systems. That said, for infrequently modified directories and files, co...

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Does the Windows® Search Indexer operate differently on SSDs?

No, it does not. It will operate exactly as it would if operating on HDDs.

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Is BitLocker®’s encryption process optimized to work on SSDs?

Yes, on NTFS. When BitLocker® is first configured on a partition, the entire partition is read, encrypted and written back out. As this is done, the NTFS file system will issue TRIM commands to help the SSD opt...

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Are RAID configurations with SATA SSDs a viable option?

Yes. The reliability and/or performance benefits one can obtain via SATA HDD RAID configurations can be had with SATA SSD RAID configurations. Setup, maintenance, RAID levels, etc. are exactly the same as with...

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Should the pagefile be placed on SSDs?

Yes. Most pagefile operations are small random reads or larger sequential writes, both of which are types of operations that SSDs handle well.

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What is TRIM?

TRIM is part of the ATA command set (UNMAP in the SCSI command set) and a tool to keep your SSD tidy and fast. TRIM allows for the operating system to notify the SSDs about which blocks are no longer in use and...

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Does Windows® support TRIM?

Yes, all versions of Windows® since Windows® 7 and Windows® Server 2008 R2 support the TRIM command.

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